In laymen’s terms, 3S Services is an oil and gas company, but as owner Brandon Webb of Carrizo Springs, Texas, explains, it’s really much more.

“It’s not all oil and gas. It’s an energy company. We build pipelines, we build facilities. We have a big, big maintenance program that we do. 3S Services is the umbrella. I have engineering design firms. I have a powerline business—your infrastructure, your distribution of powerlines. I have INE, meaning, it’s all your below-the-powerlines electrical. We work in hospitals all over the place. So, we work in and out of the oil and gas industry.”

Webb, 43, who won Cheyenne Frontier Days in 2017 heading for Kollin VonAhn, built the company from scratch.

Webb and VonAhn Tie Rogers and Petska for Cheyenne Frontier Days Title

“I got married really, really early on,” Webb said. “I was 21 and my wife was 18, and I decided I needed to go learn a trade—so, I did. I worked in electrical departments. I worked for Conoco Phillips for nine years and then I started my own business in 2008 with one employee.”

According to Webb, the path from then to now was paved with integrity—a cornerstone of what he aims to deliver.

“I didn’t have a dollar to my name. I grew up on a ranch in South Texas and my dad farmed and ranched and … we just didn’t have a lot, you know? All we knew how to do was work and try hard and that’s what we did. We just continued to do a good job and do what we said we were going to do.

“It’s pretty simple. For me, that’s the recipe to success: the integrity side. People just kept bringing us on and on and on, and I grew from one to 100 to 1,000 to 1,500 to 2,000 people. It’s been crazy. But it’s been good. We’ve been blessed.”

Webb and his family also raise registered Brangus cattle and have acquired a tidy herd of impressive mares to breed, including Colby Lovell’s Annie and embryos from Dustin Bird’s Dolly. He’s also in hot pursuit of making the NFR.

Mare Power: Greatest Mares in the Team Roping Industry 

“That is my goal,” Webb posited. “I didn’t rope when I started my business. Then, I wanted to go roping, kind of because everyone said it couldn’t be done. A guy who was 38 years old or 37 years old to come in here and be able to compete with [the pros.] So, I’ve been going at it the same way I started my business. I built a facility and had 9 or 10 head horses saddled every day and I would rope a lot of cattle. And I’ve had a lot of help.”

Webb explains that, with his ranching roots and work ethic, he started out trying to do everything on his own—saddling every horse, for instance—but has learned, particularly from friends like Trevor Brazile and Patrick Smith, to put good help in places where he needs it.

“I felt like you had to pay your dues and you had to do it all yourself. Well, I figured out, to balance family and business and rodeo and everything you need help. It takes an army. So, I have some really good guys here at the ranch that, first thing in the morning, they saddle every horse.

Having It All: Balancing Roping, Family and Work 

“I know that doesn’t really sound good to some people, but it’s fact, because I’ve got to balance it all. When I get here, I run my cattle and work on what I’m working on. I have people videoing, and I work through all that. I step off my horse and it’s back to business. That’s how I do it. And yes, it’s probably going to take me a little longer, but I’m going to get it done.”

Webb suggests that once the business lines out following the incredible irregularites of 2020, he'll be back on the rodeo road.

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