Spoke Length

The old-school rule is that your spoke should be the length of your arm. Sometimes mine gets a little longer but, generally, I want to keep it that length. If it gets too long, you won’t feel your tip and you’ll struggle to turn your rope over. You will be swinging just to swing. Cory Petska can use a lot of spoke, but for me, when I shorten it up, I have more success, particularly jackpotting.

[Listen: The Short Score NFR BONUS: Round 1 Winners Wade and Davison]

[Listen: The Short Score NFR BONUS: Round 3 Winners Wade and Davison]

[SHOP: Davison's Rope Bag]

Classic Ropes Powerline Lite HM

Classic Rope Gloves

Classic Deluxe Rope Bag

Classic Professional Rope Bag

Classic Equine Elastic Rope Strap

Zesterra

Purina Ultium Gastric Care

Purina Amplify High-Fat Supplement

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Loop Size

I used to use a small loop, until I roped with Rich Skelton. Every time I’d walk into the box, he’d drag my loop out three more feet. The bigger the loop you use heeling, the better off you are. That old saying, “big loop, big money,” isn’t a joke. It goes with feeling your tip and everything as you set it on the ground. Jade Corkill uses a small loop, but he’s a different animal.

[Read: Mastering the Heel Loop with Clay O'Brien Cooper]

Feed

I used to rope a lot of calves, so I feed on my first swing a lot. I feed maybe twice through five swings. Once my loop feels good, I don’t feed again. A lot of guys will feed just before their delivery, but that’s a bad habit that will change your delivery. TRJ

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